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Good practices

33 Strategies of War

48 Laws of Power

  1. Never Outshine the Master
  2. Never Put Too Much Trust in Friends. Use Your Enemies
  3. Conceal Your Intentions
  4. Always Say Less than Necessary
  5. Protect Your Reputation at All Costs
  6. Court Attention at All Costs
  7. Get Others Do the Work For You, But Take the Credit
  8. Make People Come to You
  9. Win Through Actions, Never Through Argument
  10. Don’t Get Infected by Misery and Misfortune
  11. Learn to Keep People Dependent on You
  12. Use Selective Honesty & Generosity to Disarm Your Victim
  13. Get Help by Appealing to Self-Interest, Never to Their Mercy
  14. Pose As a Friend Work As a Spy
  15. Crush Your Enemy Totally
  16. Raise your Value Through Absence and Scarcity
  17. Keep Others in Suspended Terror: Cultivate an Air of Unpredictability
  18. Don’t Isolate Yourself Behind a Fortress
  19. Know Who You’re Dealing with
  20. Do Not Commit to Anyone
  21. Play A Sucker to Catch a Sucker: Seem Dumber Than Your Mark
  22. Use the Surrender Tactic
  23. Concentrate Your Forces
  24. Play the Perfect Courtier
  25. Re-Create Yourself
  26. Keep Your Hands Clean
  27. Play on People’s Need to Believe to Create a Cult-like Following
  28. Enter Action With Boldness
  29. Plan All The Way to The End
  30. Make Your Accomplishments Seem Effortless
  31. Control the Options
  32. Play to People’s Fantasies
  33. Discover Each Man’s Thumbscrew
  34. Be Royal in Your Own Fashion – Act Like a King to Be Treated Like One
  35. Master the Art of Timing
  36. Disdain Things You Cannot Have: Ignoring Them is the Best Revenge
  37. Create Compelling Spectacles
  38. Think As You Like, But Behave Like Others
  39. Stir Up Waters to Catch Fish
  40. Despise the Free Lunch
  41. Avoid Stepping Into a Great Man’s Shoes
  42. Strike the Shepherd to Scatter the Sheep
  43. Work on The Hearts and Minds of Others
  44. Disarm and Infuriate with the Mirror Effect
  45. Preach the Need for Change, But Never Reform Too Much at Once
  46. Never Appear Too Perfect
  47. Do Not go Past The Mark You Aimed For, In Victory, Know When to Stop
  48. Assume Formlessness

Taxonomy of Innovation

  • Looking: Observing human experience
    • Ethnographic research: Studying human behavior in its natural setting to uncover opportunities for innovation
      • Interviewing: Gathering information through direct dialogue
      • Fly-on-the-wheel observation: Doing unobtrusive research
      • Contextual inquiry: Interviewing people in their own environment
      • Walk-a-mile immersion: Building empathy through firsthand experience
    • Participatory research: Learning from people by giving them ways to express themselves, revealing critical and latent needs
      • What's on your radar? Plotting items according to personal significance
      • Buy a feature: Using artificial money to express trade-off decisions
      • Build your own: Expressing ideal solutions with symbolic elements
      • Journaling: Recording personal experiences in words and pictures
    • Evaluative research: Assess the usefulness and usability of products and processes n order to set a course for improving them
      • Think-aloud testing: Narrating one's experience while performing a task
      • Heuristic review: Auditing on the basis of 10 rules of good design
      • Critique: Giving and receiving constructive feedback
      • System usability scale: Quantifying feedback from a usability survey
  • Understanding: Analyzing challenges & opportunities
    • People & Systems: Synthesizing and summarizing the understanding of all kinds of people. places, and things to create new value
      • Stakeholder mapping: Diagramming people's roles in a system
      • Persona profile: Summarizing stakeholder views, needs, and goals
      • Experience diagramming: Mapping a journey through tasks
      • Concept mapping: Depicting relationships within a given domain
    • Patterns & Priorities: Identifying relationships to determine what is related, relevant, and important
      • Affinity clustering: Sorting items by similarity
      • Bull's-eye diagramming: Ranking items by importance
      • Importance/difficult matrix: Plotting items in a 2x2 analysis
      • Visualize the vote: Polling collaborators to reveal preferences
    • Problem framing: Characterizing the situation differently so that innovative solutions can emerge
      • Problem tree analysis: Exploring the causes and effects of an issue
      • Statement starters: Phrasing problem statements to invite exploration
      • Abstraction laddering: Reconsidering a problem by adjusting its focus
      • Rose, thorn, bud: Identifying things as positive, negative, or having potential
  • Making: Envisioning future possibilities
    • Concept ideation: Exploring numerous possibilities using alternatives to conventional brainstorming
      • Thumbnail sketching: Making quick drawings to generate new ideas
      • Creative matrix: Sparking new ideas at the intersection of categories
      • Round-robin: Evolving ideas by passing them from person to person
      • Alternative worlds: Using different perspectives to generate ideas
    • Modeling & Prototyping: Combating risk aversion by modeling new ideas through fast and frequent iteration
      • Storyboarding: Showing new processes through a series of images
      • Schematic diagramming: Outlining a system's structure and components
      • Rough & ready prototyping: Modelling an idea quickly
      • Appearance modeling: Emphasizing visual styling with a refined model
    • Design rationale: Conveying a concept's full potential so that participants will do what's needed for ideas to flourish
      • Concept poster: Presenting the main elements of an idea
      • Video scenario: Showing the attributes of a new concept in use
      • Cover story mock-up: Describing an idea's future success in a faux article
      • Quick reference guide: Summarizing the principles and elements of an idea

Remote-working Basics

Remote-only work promotes:

  • Hiring and working from all over the world instead of from a central location.
  • Flexible working hours over set working hours.
  • Writing down and recording knowledge over verbal explanations.
  • Written-down processes over on-the-job training.
  • Public sharing of information over need-to-know access.
  • Opening every document to change by anyone over top-down control of documents.
  • Asynchronous communication over synchronous communication.
  • The results of work over the hours put in.
  • Formal communication channels over informal communication channels.

Carnegie: How to Win Friends and Influence People

  • 1.1 Don't criticize.
  • 1.2 Give appreciaton.
  • 1.3 Arouse a want.
  • 2.1 Become interested.
  • 2.2 Smile.
  • 2.3 Remember name.
  • 2.4 Be a listener.
  • 2.5 Talk in other interests.
  • 2.6 Make feel important.
  • 3.1 Avoid argument.
  • 3.2 Respect opinions.
  • 3.3 Admit if wrong.
  • 3.4 Begin friendly.
  • 3.5 Get say yes.
  • 3.6 Let do deal of talking.
  • 3.7 Let feel idea is his or hers.
  • 3.8 See other point of view.
  • 3.9 Be sympathic with ideas.
  • 3.10 Appeal to nobler motives.
  • 3.11 Dramatize ideas.
  • 3.12 Throw down challenge.
  • 4.1 Begin with praise.
  • 4.2 Attention mistakes indirectly.
  • 4.3 Talk own mistakes first.
  • 4.4 Ask instead of orders.
  • 4.5 Let save face.
  • 4.6 Praise improvement.
  • 4.7 Give reputation.
  • 4.8 Give encouragement.
  • 4.9 Make happy about own suggest.

Seven Shortcuts to a Happy Life

  1. Maximize your control.
  2. Set attainable goals.
  3. Be flexible.
  4. Have a close relationship with your partner.
  5. Have a few happy friends.
  6. Have a few close professional alliances.
  7. Evolve your ideal lifestyle.

Richard Koch | The 80/20 Principle | 2007 | page 251

Ten Golden Rules for Career Success

  1. Specialize in a very small niche; develop a core skill.
  2. Choose a niche that you enjoy, where you can excel and stand a chance of becoming an acknowledged leader.
  3. Realize that knowledge is power.
  4. Identify your market and core customers and serve them best.
  5. Identify where 20 per cent of effort gives 80 per cent of returns.
  6. Learn from the best.
  7. Become self-employed early in your career.
  8. Employ as many net value creators as possible.
  9. Use outside contractors for everything but your core skill.
  10. Exploit capital leverage.

Richard Koch | The 80/20 Principle | 2007 | page 211

Koch's 10 Commandments of Investment

  1. Make your investment philosophy reflect your personality.
  2. Be proactive and unbalanced.
  3. Invest mainly in the stock market.
  4. Invest for the long term.
  5. Invest most when the market ist low.
  6. If you can't beat the market, track it.
  7. Build your investments on your expertise.
  8. Consider the merits of emerging markets.
  9. Cull your loss makers.
  10. Run your gains.

Richard Koch | The 80/20 Principle | 2007 | page 227

Uber's Principles

  • Customer obsession: Start with what is best for the customer.
  • Make magic: Seek breakthroughs that will stand the test of time.
  • Big bold bets: Take risks and plant seeds that are five to ten years out.
  • Inside out: Find the gap between popular perception and reality.
  • Champion's mind-set: Put everything you have on the field to overcome adversity and get Uber over the finish line.
  • Optimistic leadership: Be inspiring.
  • Superpumped: Ryan Grave's original Twitter proclamation after Kalanick replaced him as CEO; the world is a puzzle to be solved with enthusiasm.
  • Be an owner, not a renter: Revolutions are won by true believers.
  • Meritocracy and toe-stepping: The best idea always wins. Don't sacrifice truth for social cohesion and don't hesitate to challenge the boss.
  • Let builders build: People must be empowered to build things.
  • Always be hustlin': Get more done with less, working longer, harder, and smarter, not just two out of three.
  • Celebrate cities: Everything we do is to make cities better.
  • Be yourself: Each of us should be authentic.
  • Principled confrontation: Sometimes the world and its institutions need to change in order for the future to be ushered in.

Brad Stone | The Upstarts | 2017

Auftragsklärung

Situation

  1. What is the starting point for this initiative?
  2. As little as possible, as much as necessary.

Complication

  1. What is the problem or trigger for this initiative?
  2. Is this really why we're talking?

Higher Intent

  1. How does your initiative contribute to what your company wants to achieve?
  2. Why is this a priority for you and your company?

Intent

  1. What do you really, really want to achieve? (140 chars)
  2. Does it give direction without dictating the solution?Is ist energising?

Boundaries

  1. What must not happen as a side effect? What is not in scope? What are necessary conditions?
  2. Does it help do define the playing field?

Hypotheses

  1. What must be true so that your output leads the intended outcome?
  2. What user behaviour will change? Do you mention all key assumptions which you make to link output to outcome?

Input

  1. Who needs to work on this? How much money is needed?
  2. Is the required input confirmed?

Output

  1. What are you delivering in front of internal or external customers? (Think job-to-be-done not features) What are rough timings?
  2. Are you leaving enough autonomy for the team to shape the actual solution?

Outcome

  1. Which metric will you use to measure success? What is the ambition level?
  2. Will you know if you are making progress towards the intent? Is it challenging, yet realistic?

Business Analyst Mindset

  1. Focus on business - calibrate solutions to business goals
  2. Solve the right problem
  3. Question everything
  4. Lead and facilitate
  5. Analysis before synthesis; Information before requirements
  6. Uncover gaps - Do not cover them up
  7. Simplify until nothing can be removed
  8. Take responsibility for shared understanding of business requirements
  9. Accept and embrace business change
  10. Be part of the solution
  11. Expect human behaviour from human beings
  12. Learn, adapt, and thrive

Proposition Simplification

Step One: Easier to Use

  • Eliminate
  • Make intuitive and easier
  • Make faster
  • Make smaller / lighter / more portable
  • Make easier to obtain

Step Two: More Useful

  • Vary performance - Make more or less powerful
  • Improve quality
  • Add new capabilities without adversely affecting ease of use
  • Provide a wider range of products
  • Personalize

Step Three: More Aesthetically Appealing

Richard Koch | Simplify | 2016

Price Simplification

Simplifying Product Redesign

  • Subtract features
  • Reduce variety
  • Add cheap benefits

Business System Redesign

  • Automate
  • Orchestrate
  • Co-opt customers
  • Sell direct
  • Use simpler technology

Scale Up

  • International scale up

Richard Koch | Simplify | 2016

Wahnsinnskarriere (DE)

  • Lass die Finger vom Computer.
  • Verlerne absichtlich, was du weiĂźt.
  • Bewege dich im Zentrum der Macht.
  • Verlasse dich niemals auf die Personalabteilung.
  • Sei gut mit Menschen.
  • VerstoĂźe bewusst gegen Regeln.
  • Sorge in kritischen Situationen immer fĂĽr die UnterstĂĽtzung von Mächtigen.
  • Fange viele Dinge an, aber bringe nichts Wesentliches zu Ende.
  • Karriere und Unternehmensinteressen haben nichts miteinander zu tun.
  • Zeige Kadavergehorsam.
  • Sei unnachsichtig und, wenn nötig, ungerecht.
  • Teile niemals Erfolg in Gegenwart von wichtigen Leuten.
  • Mache aus jeder MĂĽcke einen Elefanten.
  • Sei nicht loyal.
  • Sei niemals konsequent. - Wechsle täglich deine Meinung.
  • Betrachte deine Familie als den Wurmfortsatz deiner Karriere.
  • Wenn du oben bist, stellst du dir eine Frage.

Wolfgang Schur et al. | Wahnsinnskarriere | 2011

Digital marketing success framework

Engage you current customers for repeat and referral business

  1. Know your client
  2. Solve their problems
  3. Be clear on your value
  4. Set goals for results
  5. Understand the buyer's journey
  6. Pick your channels
  7. Plan your content
  8. Nurture your leads
  9. Convert prospects to customers

Ten Types of Innovation

  • Configuration
    • Profit Model
      • Ad-Supported (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Auction (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Bundled Pricing (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Cost Leadership (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Disaggregated Pricing (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Financing (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Flexible Pricing (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Float (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Forced Scarcity (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Freemium (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Installed Base (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Licensing (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Membership (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Metered Use (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Microtransactions (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Premium (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Risk Sharing (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Scaled Transactions (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Subscription (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • Switchboard (Configuration - Profit Model)
      • User-Defined (Configuration - Profit Model)
    • Network
      • Alliances (Configuration - Network)
      • Collaboration (Configuration - Network)
      • Complementary Partnering (Configuration - Network)
      • Consolidation (Configuration - Network)
      • Coopetition (Configuration - Network)
      • Franchising (Configuration - Network)
      • Merger / Acquisition (Configuration - Network)
      • Open Innovation (Configuration - Network)
      • Secondary Markets (Configuration - Network)
      • Supply Chain Integration (Configuration - Network)
    • Structure
      • Asset Standardization (Configuration - Structure)
      • Competency Center (Configuration - Structure)
      • Corporate University (Configuration - Structure)
      • Decentralized Management (Configuration - Structure)
      • Incentive System (Configuration - Structure)
      • IT Integration (Configuration - Structure)
      • Knowledge Management (Configuration - Structure)
      • Organizational Design (Configuration - Structure)
      • Outsourcing (Configuration - Structure)
    • Process
      • Crowdsourcing (Configuration - Process)
      • Flexible Manufacturing (Configuration - Process)
      • Intellectual Property (Configuration - Process)
      • Lean Production (Configuration - Process)
      • Localization (Configuration - Process)
      • Logistics Systems (Configuration - Process)
      • On-Demand Production (Configuration - Process)
      • Predictive Analytics (Configuration - Process)
      • Process Automation (Configuration - Process)
      • Process Efficiency (Configuration - Process)
      • Process Standardization (Configuration - Process)
      • Strategic Design (Configuration - Process)
      • User-Generated (Configuration - Process)
  • Offering
    • Product Performance
      • Added Functionality (Offering - Product Performance)
      • Conservation (Offering - Product Performance)
      • Customization (Offering - Product Performance)
      • Ease of Use (Offering - Product Performance)
      • Engaging Functionality (Offering - Product Performance)
      • Environmental Sensitivity (Offering - Product Performance)
      • Feature Aggregation (Offering - Product Performance)
      • Focus (Offering - Product Performance)
      • Performance Simplification (Offering - Product Performance)
      • Safety (Offering - Product Performance)
      • Styling (Offering - Product Performance)
      • Superior Product (Offering - Product Performance)
    • Product System
      • Complements (Offering - Product System)
      • Extension / Plug-ins (Offering - Product System)
      • Integrated Offering (Offering - Product System)
      • Modular Systems (Offering - Product System)
      • Product Bundling (Offering - Product System)
      • Product / Service Platforms (Offering - Product System)
  • Experience
    • Service
      • Added Value (Experience - Service)
      • Concierge (Experience - Service)
      • Guarantee (Experience - Service)
      • Lease or Loan (Experience - Service)
      • Loyalty Programs (Experience - Service)
      • Personalized Service (Experience - Service)
      • Self-Service (Experience - Service)
      • Superior Service (Experience - Service)
      • Supplementary Service (Experience - Service)
      • Total Experience Management (Experience - Service)
      • Try Before You Buy (Experience - Service)
      • User Communities / Support Systems (Experience - Service)
    • Channel
      • Context-Specific (Experience - Channel)
      • Cross-Selling (Experience - Channel)
      • Diversification (Experience - Channel)
      • Experience Center (Experience - Channel)
      • Flagship Store (Experience - Channel)
      • Go Direct (Experience - Channel)
      • Indirect Distribution (Experience - Channel)
      • Multi-Level Marketing (Experience - Channel)
      • Non-Traditional Channels (Experience - Channel)
      • On-Demand (Experience - Channel)
      • Pop-Up Preference (Experience - Channel)
    • Brand
      • Brand Extension (Experience - Brand)
      • Brand Leverage (Experience - Brand)
      • Certification (Experience - Brand)
      • Co-Branding (Experience - Brand)
      • Component Branding (Experience - Brand)
      • Private Label (Experience - Brand)
      • Transparency (Experience - Brand)
      • Values Alignment (Experience - Brand)
    • Customer Engagement
      • Autonomy and Authority (Experience - Customer Engagement)
      • Community and Belonging (Experience - Customer Engagement)
      • Curation (Experience - Customer Engagement)
      • Experience Automation (Experience - Customer Engagement)
      • Experience Enabling (Experience - Customer Engagement)
      • Experience Simplification (Experience - Customer Engagement)
      • Mastery (Experience - Customer Engagement)
      • Personalization (Experience - Customer Engagement)
      • Status and Recognition (Experience - Customer Engagement)
      • Whimsey and Personality (Experience - Customer Engagement)

Business Model Patterns

  • Add-On
  • Affiliation
  • Aikido
  • Auction
  • Barter
  • Cash Machine
  • Cross Selling
  • Crowdfunding
  • Crowdsourcing
  • Customer Loyalty
  • Digitization
  • Direct Selling
  • E-Commerce
  • Experience Selling
  • Flat Rate
  • Fractional Ownership
  • Franchising
  • Freemium
  • From Push to Pull
  • Guaranteed Availability
  • Hidden Revenue
  • Ingredient Branding
  • Integrator
  • Layer Player
  • Leverage Customer Data
  • License
  • Lock-In
  • Long Tail
  • Make More of It
  • Mass Customization
  • No Frills
  • Open Business Model
  • Open Source
  • Orchestrator
  • Pay per Use
  • Pay What You Want
  • Peer-to-Peer
  • Performance-Based-Contracting
  • Razor and Blade
  • Rent Instead of Buy
  • Revenue Sharing
  • Reverse Engineering
  • Reverse Innovation
  • Robin Hood
  • Self-Service
  • Shop-in-Shop
  • Solution Provider
  • Subscription
  • Supermarket
  • Target the Poor
  • Trash-to-Cash
  • Two-Sided-Market
  • Ultimate Luxury
  • User Designed
  • White Label

Gassmann et al. | The Business Model Navigator | 2015